Matty Healy suggests a Drive Like I Do album is coming out in February

The 1975‘s Matty Healy says a new album under the band’s Drive Like I Do moniker could be coming out next February.

Healy has been teasing an album under the moniker for a number of years, and an EP called ‘Scary Monsters’ was released on streaming services back in October.

Earlier this week, he continued to tease new material from the band, pointing fans to a newly set up Drive Like I Do Instagram account.

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Yesterday (December 16), Healy shared a photo of the pre-1975 band performing live in Newcastle in 2005 on his Instagram account.

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A post shared by MATTY 🥾🌍 Amnesty Uk – DH00280 (@trumanblack)

After a fan replied: “we want a new DLID record,” Healy simply responded: “ok”.

When asked to elaborate, the frontman linked to a new Instagram page, @drivelikeido. The page, followed by Healy, currently has over 12,000 followers and two ambiguous posts, one captioned: “That Wasn’t Even The Craziest Thing That Went Down.”

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A post shared by @drivelikeido

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Now, during an Instagram Live conversation, Healy was asked when the album would be released, to which he replied: “Probably like February.”

Healy told NME earlier this year that he was working on getting old Drive Like I Do songs remastered.

“I’m getting the old stuff remastered and I’m basically going to put out the first album, the album that never was released,” Healy said in May of his plans to resurrect his old band.

“And then we’ll follow that up with a new album. There’s so much Drive Like I Do stuff that was great that there’s not even demos of, so I’m going to record those songs and put them out with the two records that do kind of technically exist in the world.”






This week, Matty Healy said he’s a “much better person” since he quit social media. The frontman spoke on Reddit of how he had a “powerful realisation that I spend years and years on artistic statements” in the form of The 1975’s albums, but would then tweet his personal views online “without even thinking about it”.

“It’s such a weird paradox,” he added. “And yeah sometimes I get it right but sometimes I look like a twat and that makes my work worse. I found myself asking myself ‘for what?’ some attention in the moment? A short cut towards feeling good about myself?”